‘I want to be the first person to say ‘Thank you’ for the dogs’: Former Boston police officer on how to thank a family of dogs

Police officers are coming to grips with a new reality: they’re no longer going to be able to thank the dogs that are always with them.

And, they say, they’re having to look at the dogs they do have and think of them as people.

That means that officers who come to work every day without a dog will be asked to take them home, said Sgt. John McGovern, a police department spokesman.

But for those who do, that’s a very different situation.

“It’s kind of a different mentality to how you treat your pets,” he said.

“They’re your family.

It’s important for them to be taken care of, but we’ve got to remember it’s the police officers that are there for the officers.”

The New York Times reports that some officers in the New York Police Department have already started asking themselves whether it makes sense to put their dog at the front door when the dog is a police dog.

“We are doing our best to be compassionate, but it just doesn’t make sense,” said New York police Officer Joseph DiBattista.

“I don’t think you should put your dog in your home for the first time, and that’s something that is out of our control.

I don’t want to have to say that out loud.

You’ve got the police department, and you’ve got people in there that have to deal with people who are a little bit different from you.”

He added that the officers need to find a balance, saying, “I think if I were you, I would have been able to say, ‘I have a dog.

And if I can’t talk to him, then we’re going to get rid of the dog.

The Times reported that the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees the U.S. Border Patrol, is looking at whether to make the process even more difficult for officers who have a pet. “

It will be a different day, and a different conversation, for me, when I see a dog on the street,” he added.

The Times reported that the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees the U.S. Border Patrol, is looking at whether to make the process even more difficult for officers who have a pet.

The Border Patrol is also taking steps to help its officers by making the process less traumatic.

On Saturday, the Border Patrol told ABC News it will be allowing its officers to adopt dogs at its facilities, even if they have a physical dog that’s not on the border.

It also announced it is going to change its policy to allow police dogs to be used for border enforcement. “As the U